Total Eclipse

After finishing the Fantagraphics Floppies series of blog articles, I promised myself that I’d never do anything like that again, and I’d probably never read a comic book again. EVER!

But then time passes and I started thinking about doing another one… but perhaps with a smaller publisher… one that had published some great comics, like Red Ink, Vortex or Tragedy Strikes Press. Nothing as extensive as Fantagraphics.

Eclipse Comics popped into my head.

Now, Fantagraphics has published some wonderful comics that have gone on to live forever. Eclipse Comics has… not. Fantagraphics has Love & Rockets, Eightball, Way Out Strips, Acme Novelty Library. You know. The Best Cartoonists In The World.

Eclipse had ESPers.

OK, I’m exaggerating slightly. Fantagraphics has published their share of dross, but also a lot of interesting stuff. Virtually none of what Eclipse published has been reprinted. Miracleman, Zot!, … Er… That might be it.

So why Eclipse? Why would a grown person be interested in re-reading a publisher who produced comics mostly for 14-year-olds? I don’t know, and I think I’m talking myself out of doing this now.

Meanwhile, I’m starting to buy the Eclipse comics I didn’t buy in the 80s.

Man, shopping for comics is hard. I mean, if you don’t want to spend the absolute max amount.

 

(This long and even more boring Shopping Comics For Dummies can safely be left unread.)

OK, here’s my methodology, if I were to buy, say, the four issues of The Blanderizer series, in lowish grades.

I have several tabs open.

First I go to Ebay and search for “The Blanderizer complete”. I find one that wants to all four issues for $1… but with $13 postage. I sigh.

So I go to Mile High Comics, because I like them and they have a lot. They also have the absolute highest prices for a lot of stuff, but there’s usually a “codeword sale” going on that drops the posted price by about 50% (so get on the mailing list where they tell you what the codeword is). But even with that rebate, their prices are sometimes “whaa?”. So let’s say The Blanderizer #1 is posted as $2, #2 is $45, #3 is $1 and #4 is $5. I quickly click “buy” on #3 and #1 (so those are 50c and $1). (Postage is free if you buy a lot.)

Then I go to CyberspaceComics on ebay, because they are the cheapest (if you buy a lot. Their normal postage is $4, but it drops to 25c per issue if you buy a lot). So I see #2 posted as $1 (so it’s $1.25) and click “buy”. But there’s a lot that they don’t have…

So I go to the My Comic Shop tab and find #4 for $1.95. (Postage is a flat $5 no matter how much you buy.) They have almost as much as Mile High, and their prices are more “even”. But they basically have a price floor at $1.70, so Mile High are cheaper on the cheap stuff.

If all else fails, I go to Amazon, but since you’re bound to get a $4 postage surcharge, buying single issues there isn’t the most economical thing to do. But if you’re buying graphic novels, Amazon is usually cheaper than all the options I’ve mentioned above.

So it’s so complicated: You’ve got to get the volume up at all of these; if not, the postage is going to dominate. If you’re buying hundreds of comics in one go (which I did for this project), shopping around this way decimated the cost compared to buying from just one of the major ones (i.e., Mile High or My Comics).

The median acquisition cost for the comics I bought I guesstimate is around $1.80, which is quite cheap by modern comics standards, and is about the median cover price. Which means that “investing” in Eclipse Comics was not a good idea, if anybody had ever imagined that.

I hope you were as bored reading that as I was writing it.

 

The allure of Eclipse Comics is perhaps that they were a sort of midpoint between “mainstream” superhero fare and “alternative” comics. They published a lot of slightly quirky genre stuff. Nothing too outrageous, but basically decent.

Perhaps that’s it. Reading basically decent comics somehow seems attractive these days. I can’t figure out why.

I’ll be covering the entirety of Eclipse Comics’s output excepting books that reprints other books Eclipse has published. And I’ll do it chronologically by title.

I briefly considered doing it on a month-by-month basis; one blog article per month of the 80s, but that seemed a bit too OCD even for me. Instead I’ll do it chronologically by the date the first issue of the series in question was published. And I’ll be lumping related series into the same blog post to avoid having to do 260 blog posts. Instead there’ll be… er… over a hundred? Something like that?

Let’s get started.

2 thoughts on “Total Eclipse”

  1. You are one of the unsung heroes of the literary world — Bibliographers and compilers of Checklists to aid OCD collectors like me. Your hours of painstaking research make it so much easier for the rest of us, so thank you. I have a large collection of Eclipse comics, and I have one little problem with their 3-D comics. Apparently there were at least 19 issues of 3-D comics planned, but the only ones issued that I have found are 3-D Three Stooges #1-3, Captain EO 3-D, and 3-D Destroy! In the ECLIPSE 3-D SERIES these are numbered 11, 14, 19, 17, 18 respectively. Do you have a complete list of the ECLIPSE 3-D SERIES as planned, including unpublished issues? I’m dying to know what I am missing, and what might have been. Thanks for any help you can provide.

    Like

    1. I think I’ve covered all of the published 3-D issues. I plan on doing an index once I’ve done all the comics and do more thorough listings of 3-D, trading cards and graphic novels, but I don’t have a 3-D list yet. But let’s see…

      There’s two issues of Seduction of the Innocent 3-D, four of Adolescent Radioactive Black Belt Hamsters, one Miracleman, 3-D Alien Terror, one issue of Mr. Monster, 3-D Laser Eraser and Pressbutton, and Tor 3-D. How much is that all together? Together with the ones you mention, there’s at least 16? I may be missing some; the index will be more methodical. 🙂

      But I don’t know anything about unpublished 3-D issues. Perhaps I should do more research…

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s